Internalised Racism – Trade

This is the last section of writing concerning Internalised Racism – momentarily…

Poor Trade
These acts of internalised racism, projective identification and lateral violence are a culmination of factors that arise from historic legacies of systemic abuse, cultural annihilation and attempts to assimilate and acculturate amongst dominant social groups, with varying degrees of success and also harm. Where invaders instituted themselves as overlords upon the global South. Governance and theft of wealth and people were besieged trades.

Valueless
A group of people who are repeatedly shown by law, by land acquisition, by land domination, that worthiness does not include their ilk – doubles down on a form of insidious self harm that spans generations. In South Africa – Apartheid was instituted as a way to separate groups of people. Trevor Noah’s book ‘Born A Crime‘ discusses apartheid with candour and honesty. Being Trevor Noah he also inserts humor to illuminate the systems *ludicrosity. What has taken place within many countries on the continent of Africa as well as in the Caribbean as well as in South America, Central America – Colonialism. Another system of installing foreign concepts that do little more than remove wealth and install European standards of control and dominance.

Self Harm
In North America, the idea of Black people, descendants of African people from the African diaspora, are calculated as being without value. It is the reason that Black Lives Matter as a social movement has held such a prominent public position over the last few years. Indigenous populations were also summarily assigned to an unwanted category, destined for acts that dehumanized and sought tactics for annihilation or assimilation. When we as a global majority, support and uphold our illegitimate end of a shitty bargain and unconsciously abide by ways of being that further harm, denigrate and prevent growth –  an outcome can look like self hatred and furthering a genocidal tendency from within and amongst.

Before Columbus
I am mindful of the Maya, the Aztecs, the Aboriginal communities of Australia, the Maori, the Egyptians, the empires of West Africa, India, China, Japan all have historical legacy and local and international stories of trade commerce and war. I wonder what hidden unsavory aspects of history are left to be told amongst these cultures.

All of this
This series of blogs on Internalised began with me at 6 years old being bullied. The 6 part blog series has invited me to reflect on an uncomfortable realisation of projective identification and internalised racism. By two older girls caring little about me. Possibly caring less about themselves. Left to figure out for myself, what it means to be a black male, the middle son, interested in art – being disliked because of my 2 cultural heritage vantage points of Guyana and Ghana. Black overall. Configuring amongst a constellation of ideas with a beginners mind what the journey beyond may look like. Internalised Racism still doesn’t make sense. It is a blight, but like shame and grief which can be healed with understanding and compassion, so too can Internalised Racism’s internal wounds.

Hating of myself was not an option I would ever knowingly choose. Disliking others who have skin tones lighter or darker than my own never entered my frame of reference. Black, Brown – Human is what we are. Now as a father, therapist, supervisor, lay philosopher/researcher, writer, I realise resolution may happen after many years of work (the next 400 possibly). Amongst colleagues and with friends – we are to challenge these interior codes and bring them to full awareness much like shame, in order to heal.

The aim for me, is to work out what generates healing and get at removing the cancer that is Internalised Racism.

Resources
Trevor Noah’s book Born a Crime is a brave insight to an interesting man’s life growing up in Soweto South Africa. The book amply describes state sanctioned systemic oppression and racism of Black and Coloured people.
The Code Switch Podcast referenced A Treaty Right for Cherokee Representation that provides a useful example of shady deals the US government made with an Indigenous group that forcibly moved a people from their land.
Ivan Van Sertimas book ‘They Came Before Columbus’ dispels through evidence that other than the indigenous inhabitants of Central and South America the first peoples to set foot in the Americas were from West Africa.
Listening to Joy DeGruy explain a concept that has now become widely accepted as fact. Past histories are remembered or locked into cellular memory.
Remember 9:29 is a meditation and presentation of resistance and protest in as artful a way as can be imagined.
Joy DeGruy Post Traumatic Slavery Syndrome
Remember 9:29 Produced by Tier Zero Poem by Chris Kaputo

Images
Dark Treelined ave Photo by Johannes Plenio on Unsplash

Internalised Racism – Games

I am rounding the corner on the topic of Internalised Racism with this blog. The games we play to keep ourselves safe or amuse ourselves is observed within this post.

Games
I was interested in playing Freeze Tag, Bulldog or climbing and jumping from climbing frames at my primary school. The game of disgust and dislike, projective identification, lateral violence and internalised racism would be concepts I could only begin deconstructing when adult. An unrealised inheritance. As a child I tried to make myself invisible and stay away from these two sisters. The new and best game to play. An unwilling game of hide and seek. But a type of hiding an aspect of myself that was plainly visible, similar to the faces of my friends and also of my tormentors – these Dementors, was a plight I could not extricate myself beyond. They were me. I was them. Zero sum with no winners. Mainly losers of ground, development, progress, time…

Lateral Violence
The experience of infighting amongst others who are at a similar social standing or within an organisation. The expression of animosity with others from similar cultural and racial backgrounds. Where outrage and dissention cannot be shared with managers or dominant racial, class, gender, groups for fear of individual and of a group’s destruction stall efforts at empowerment, or truth sharing.

Expression of an individual’s or a group’s displeasure, rage, disappointment in a sideways motion can be a safer way to share dissatisfaction to others. The damage is done amongst others who feel bullied, hurt, outmaneuvered, played, let down and powerless. It has been said before “Hurt people, hurt people.” Lateral violence ultimately is an extension of powerless groups expressing pain amongst people groups, similar to them.

‘Lateral violence is a term that describes the way people in positions of powerlessness, covertly or overtly direct their dissatisfaction inward toward each other, toward themselves, and toward those less powerful than themselves.’ By Jens Korff

Issues of Identity
As a group, Black people experience and perpetrate internalised racist acts against those who are African, African American, African European, African Caribbean, African LatinX. Lateral violence is also visited amongst and within Asian communities, South East Asian communities, indigenous groups in the South Pacific and across the Americas. Holding to a belief of what oppressive devious strategies were used upon many peoples across the planet to divide conquer and rule.

An outcome of hurt people who willingly went on to hurt others.

Resources
Freeze Tag is a powerful song by the super group Dinner Party that reminds of the many who whilst surrendering were still/are slain. Put your hands up. Freeze. Don’t move!
The scene from Harry Potter from Prisoner of Azkaban perfectly depicts for me the experience of the soul sucking force bullying can have.
Jens Korf goes to great lengths to explain lateral violence, and what steps can be taken to cease internal and external conflicts.
Dr Kira shares an idea of reconceptualising the idea of internalised racism.
A useful clip from a groundbreaking tv show ‘The School That Tried to End Racism’. I found Bright’s awareness of the challenges he and friends face heartfelt.
Bullying & lateral violence – Creative Spirits
Dr Kira explains Reframing Internalised Oppression
Internalised Oppression Explained The School That Tried to End Racism clip

Images
Light Signature Photo by Steve Halama on Unsplash

Internalised Racism – Missed It

I have continued with the theme of Internalised Racism offering a personal insight of how I recognise what it looks and feels like with this blog.

Miss Hit
What is missed by projecting outward on to others, what we cannot stomach? We could benefit from further understanding ourselves. This point Dr Dwight Turner invites us to spend time with. Projective Identification (P. I. ) is a self protecting act, but the act cannot fully protect the persons who expel what they cannot tolerate in themselves onto others.

It creates in the object projected upon, a sense of fear and loathing. Deficits of self-worth, self-esteem, anxiety and low mood. Manifestations of the disdain are re-presented by the subjected upon persons internally/interiorly and to others who resemble or behave in similar ways to them.

Here my attempt is to match P.I. and Internalised Racism as cousins. In essence those who are treated by a nationally sanctioned power structure; unkindly, unfairly, with prejudice, do not have the power to represent their hurt to those who hurt them. The hurt people observe the hurt in themselves internalise it and project this hurt on to others who appear similar to them. Both Zed and Daniel offer useful interpretations in last week’s post.

Division
An early experience I can remember that woke me up to what internalized racism is was being bullied at primary school by two Caribbean girls. I can’t exactly remember what these 2 girls repeatedly said to me. Something like ‘Smelly little African boy’. The resemblance was of a hatred that was borne as a result of my father – African. His genes a part of mine. This an undeniable truth. I could not make sense of their disowning of our joint cultural heritage and obvious visible similarity. My skin – brown like theirs. My mum was from the Caribbean too, so were we not the same? Not to them.

Power Over
This experience of internalised racism was one I could not comprehend at the age of 6. The bullies dislike was a felt sense of wrongness. Mine. Possibly theirs too. I assume (now), that these two sisters felt a sense of power and a feeling of entitlement.

Brené Brown discusses the concept of power over, as opposed to power with, or power amongst. The Caribbean for me was well represented amongst my friends. Culturally, London and the UK of the late 70’s to mid 80’s, Caribbean influence was acknowledged and appeared valued.

Music, Slang, Fashion all influenced by children of migrants from the Caribbean. Bob Marley and other reggae stars were regularly heard on stereo systems across the estate I lived on. My world – Tottenham High Road and Wood Green felt like mini slices of Guyana, Trinidad, Barbados, Jamaica, St Kitts, Dominica, the Grenadines. The homes we visited, the shops and grocery stores, the foods we ate were of mostly Caribbean and West African flavour and influence.

Norf
My awareness of racial and cultural understandings arrived late, like the 243 bus to Wood Green , or the 321 to Seven Sisters. The raising awareness job is a lifelong one, but peaked when I moved out of London to Cambridgeshire in the mid 80’s. The North London Estate I grew up on was filled with newly arrived immigrants from a great collection of African, Caribbean, Asian and European countries. These two girls would sneer at me whenever our paths crossed at school or on the estate. They, whispering to each other and cutting their eyes in my direction as if their waspish looks could make me disappear. Their disapproval didn’t make sense to me but left an invisible mark. That of being disliked by others for a seemingly senseless and unknown reason. I became distrustful of persons who cast unkind and disparaging looks my way.

Resources
Ursula Rucker performs Innocence Lost. The line that stands out is missed hit. The resonance is palpable as this poet intones an all too familiar story. The Roots woke me up to the power in poetry.
Hana and Leila discuss in detail the insults that are thrown back and forth between Africans and African Americans.
I thank Kimberly Cato of True Roots who passed on the Halton Voices video. Sameera discusses with guests what Internalised Racism is.
The Stoop You Called Me African What?
Diverse Perspectives conversations with Sameera Ali, Leena Sharma Seth, Mifrah Abid

Images
Cover Photo Lee Junda

Serendipity: Day 1 The Course

The Black Men’s Introduction to Group Therapy Course began on the 13th of November and was a Kings and Queen making experience with my co-counsellor Sheila Samuels. I borrow the term from Ron Brown High School and Dope Black Dad’s Podcast’s chief presenter Marvyn Harrison who addressed me recently as King.

The moment stood out, fresh like beads of sweat dotting a brow furrowed in deep concentration. Mentally I did a double take and thought…
Who is he speaking to?
Me?
Really?
King?
Oh I get it.
Those are large shoes to fill.
I’m ready to put that mantle on.

Now.

Collaborative Communication
5 men attended the group and told their stories of why they saw a need for the group. The men held out their independent requests for the room to see feel and identify with. There is a unity to be had in sharing hopes with a room who know what you are saying because they, I, we, have said similar things too.

The Philosophical meets the Practical

Safety
Groups are always nervous in the beginning. Leaders/Facilitators are too! With a new venue.
New people to get to know.
A new course.
Not knowing met with new, then came upon nuanced and introduced those who attended to what has the potential for being made to exist in the now.
For this group it was a Black safe space. Rare. A space curated, created and secured for men of the African Diaspora to meet and talk and discuss and experience warmth from a forgotten Sun. The aim – to discuss Black Mental Health with other Black Men with 2 highly skilled counsellors.

Knowing
A good therapy group often operates well with 2 counsellors steering the conversation. Having worked with Sheila at the prison a few years ago I knew she would be a great co-facilitator for this group. Knowledgeable, flexible and able to support the group engage with the sensitive topic of Black Mental Health.

Diversity
The group of 5 men with differing ages, professions, from a range of different London Boroughs, from a collection of countries of origin all came with a singular focus: To open the sometimes locked box and speak about mental health, as vulnerable, sensitive, engaged, intelligent, responsible, aware, concerned advocates and as Black men.

Sensate
There was laughter, there was a felt sense of wanting to support and be simply acknowledged as friend, brother, seeker, father, colleague like in the classic Ralph Ellis book Invisible Man being seen and understood is a priceless gift.

I could just about keep my hands from clapping all the time or staying on my seat from sheer giddy exuberance: This Was Actually Happening! Finally!

It did, and there are more to follow, on the 20th 27th November 4th, 11th 18th December.

One attendee asked if there are plans for the group to continue past the 6 weeks… Both me and Sheila looked at each other and answered “Well that all depends…”

Who Knows by Ram Dass
Thank you Anne Willoughby for introducing me to this tale…

*Cover Image from This Book Could Help