The Completion Compulsion

‘Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is the power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.’ Viktor Frankl

A few years ago an interesting idea blossomed. The thought, to interrupt the want and wish to complete an idea or action. A few experiences helped to solidify these concepts. I will detail below. Explaining thoughts like these, are useful to those interested in psychological models. Also those interested in relieving unhelpful ruminative thoughts.

IOM
The Case of Ms. Snow. For a few years I worked as a forensic mental health practitioner for Together for mental wellbeing. My role at the charity changed a number of times. I began working with one probation service in Greenwich (Jan 2015). In May/June 2015 I supported 6 probation services. The Probation service NPS/CRC (National Probation Service/Community Rehabilitation Company) were adapting to a new model of resource management. As a result the NPS contract with Together changed. ‘Doing more – with less’ was the theme of the new contract. After a year of supporting Probation services in Bexley, Bromley, Croydon, Greenwich, Merton and Sutton, I transitioned to working within the Southwark probation service. The new role was to support in partnership with Probation, Police, Housing, Substances and Rehabilitation and employment. I provided the mental health arm of support to individuals involved with the IOM (Integrated Offender Management) programme.

Mosaic In Colour

Messy
Ms. Snow a probation officer was a ‘conversational’ courts assessor. We held a fast friendship. Discussing the challenges the service users faced and how IOM and probation were aligning to provide improved health outcomes. Ms. Snow was particular about her work-station organisation! Post it notes, coloured pens, pads and computer set up just so. With impish glee, I took great pleasure in re-arranging a few items at her desk. I had an idea of how much the rearranging offset her equilibrium. Ms. Snow also shared in making a mess of my workspace in a similar way too. I wasn’t as organised or as particular about my workstation. Her efforts often caused me to smile. It’s the thought that…

Re-Arrange
I would disturb Ms. Snow’s station and then leave to meet a client and on returning note what was disturbed in my area too. Without fail Ms. Snow’s arrangement of her work area would return to pens and note pads and post it notes – to as they were before my involvement. We joked about her compulsion to restore ‘order’. We laughed about my need to increase entropy. An uneasy alliance formed about the balance between order and chaos. Her need to reassemble and my want for disorder. 2 adults acting like children in a serious setting, professionally shepherding adults facing significant difficulties. The idea for the Completion Compulsion was borne in that space. Chaos curiously can invite/inspire order.

Non-Compos
The irrationality of tidiness, or the discomfort caused by presumptions of messy work stations/offices/cars/bed/kitchen/living rooms is linked to an idea of messy space = messy mind. ‘An indicator of instability or a ‘marker’ of mental illness, some assume. Ms. Snow and I joked, laughed and made fun of her near incessant need to bring order to what appeared as chaos. A representation of the organisations and people we were working amongst at probation and Together, perhaps. An experience at a staff lunch emphasised the want for both order and completion. A common phrase was said by me which began something like ‘No smoke without…’ or ‘Sticks and Stones may break my bones but…’ As you read these words I wonder have you chosen to complete these well worn phrases? Was there an involuntary sigh as you recognised that leaving the phrases incomplete draws attention to something agape in you, unsatisfactorily incomplete? If so, you are now aware of a compulsion to complete. Because not closing the loop is often discomforting.

Unusual
Another example of a completion compulsion arrived whilst working 2 years later as a counsellor at a women’s prison in Kent. The client recently convicted. Troubled by the nature of the crime they were accused and sent to prison for. They found accepting the circumstances of being in prison impossible to bear. The crime they were sentenced for, far outside of their ‘regular’ life experience. This will not be a blog proclaiming their innocence or guilt about the crime accused and sentenced for. The blog is a piece of writing explaining how we (both *Stacey and me) were on course to interrupt her thought patterns.

Unsupported
At our first and following meetings, an exploration of Stacey’s past was uncovered. The complicated details of her education, schooling experiences and friendship networks were shared. Ideas of her being a wall flower, bullied, disliked and unsupported by peers. We unpacked what her relationships with friends and teaching staff were like. Departures were another group of people observed. Either she had left them or they had moved away from her. Her current experience of being bullied at the prison by other detainees – a reminder of her past and an uncomfortable undeniable truth about her present. Intrusive thoughts, depression, low self esteem and a waning sense of resilience were discussed and carefully explored.

Projection
We talked about patterns of behaviour and associated ideas Stacey held about herself and the past. The intrusive thoughts were linked to her disbelief about being sentenced and about the accusation that brought her to prison. Her dislike of prison. Being away from her family. Confronting difficulty daily. Her life at East Sutton Park, these aspects of her new world she was dissociated from as she had been understandably in her past. A dislocation of how her life was supposed to have turned out Stacey was barely willing to face. It was here that the interruption was to be placed. Starting with a simple game of recognising a patterned hand clap was the launch point of creating something safe and new.

RBG  Light Circles

Play
Why a game? Most games are fun to play! There is a sense of learning and enjoyment in game play. The 1,2,  1,2,3, 1,2,3,4, 3,4 hand clap is immediately recognisable. Stacey smiled as she recognised and then was able to complete. The next part of the completion compulsion game is to start the pattern of the 1,2, 1,2,3, 1,2,3,4, and not clap the 3,4 part of the pattern. The reason for this is to support tolerance of non-completion. Recognising that surviving the compulsion, is part of building an awareness to interrupting a way of being. The magic of the completion compulsion took root. What was introduced for Stacey was a new cognitive pathway and a resilience to trying something new. The game part makes the completion compulsion accessible and immediately recognisable. She smiled with concentration as she aimed not to complete the pattern. Her feet tapped out the last part of the pattern after 15 seconds.

Sigh
We laughed at how this challenge was offered and at how silly the idea of not completing left her feeling. After a few more attempts we were able to breath through the conflicting need of not completing the pattern. When Stacey identified that she could choose to either ignore or complete the compulsion she was able to live inside a paradigm shift. A woman free of the obligation to only see herself as a prisoner, as a person cast out from society for perpetrating a crime. But also to appreciate that she was a creative, able to interpret written material and support others with reading and writing at the prison.

Bi-ped
I was later taught in 2019 EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitisation Reprocessing). Engaging a client with bi-lateral stimulation (clapping, tapping, walking, lateral eye movements or saccades) changes neuro-pathways in the brain. Establishing a validity of cognition helps to embed an alternative way for a client like Stacey to perceive themselves anew. Interrupting the compulsion to complete a familiar upsetting pattern, is key to establish and access ideas of choice, space and alternative possibilities.

Pool Patterns


Applause
There are unseen rewards for completing a pattern. We are rewarded by a hormone feed of dopamine, oxytocin, serotonin and endorphins when a recognised pattern is successfully achieved. For example: the door was shut after using it, the sentence complete, the thought pattern arriving at it’s pre-imagined end.

Abrupt
Some degree of discomfort is caused when the pattern is disrupted. When the pre-destined arrival at the ‘end’ is unmet. If you can, think about calling a tele-service for banking, telecommunications, TV, Insurance or other customer experience. Passing amongst the laborious numbered steps to finally, eventually speak with someone. The service alerting you of how long the call may take until you speak with a representative. As a loyal customer, you are mentally prepared for the 5 – 30 minute wait. You’ve made time for this. The annoying music has clicked through convincing you of progress being made. Just before the call is about to be patched through to a real live person, the line goes quiet and next all that is heard is dial tone.

Livid
If like me you’re already stretched patience breaks and you begin hurling abuse at the company, and the rubbish telephone service offered, an awareness of the completion compulsion is present. Mainly because of the call not going the way you had planned. The eventual end of the conversation has been hi-jacked. The choices that someone in this position is left with are to leave the call to another time, call again immediately, rage fueled or to vow never to engage with this service again!

Battle
The reward arrives once completion of the action is met. After the tenseness of the situation is passed, a relief then fills the space that was formerly occupied. The feeling can be heightened with either food, drink, a good conversation, laughter or movement. But the reward arrives after survival of the event. Such a strong word to use to describe tolerating a moment of low stress. However it is like a micro battle of wills and wants. To have the thing sought one has to travel through the mire to the other side. We could put up walls, convincing ourselves that we don’t need the service. But the uncomfortable truth is that we recognise the importance of whatever the service is and yes, do still need. So once more back into the fray.

Relief
The completion compulsion idea is to learn tolerance of discomfort and disconnected completion. We have a pre-conceived patterned ending in mind. Reward hormones are queued up waiting to bathe the brain with feel good rewards. A peak moment of stress. Followed by an intentional interruption. The usual ending averted. Instead – a period of non-activity, of waiting, or long held moments for curiosity to brew. Asserting another possible wanted completion. Preferable to the interruption. An alternative could be as readily accepted as a proposed pre-planned expected outcome. A positive cognition is what we want the mind to begin accepting. Then allow the ‘happy’ bath of the brain to commence.

Golden Shimmer

Metamorphosis
For me, returning to the women’s prison a fortnight later, Stacey shared that there had been a change to her intrusive ideas. Speaking with family outside of the prison a shift in perception had started. Stacey and her family were lodging an appeal about her conviction. A spark of prevailing had begun to be established. Stacey had started a difficult transition to appreciating herself as a person in prison. By interrupting a pattern of thinking a newer cognitive model could be inserted and made use of. She had been able to challenge those who were making things difficult for her in prison. A visible change was noted as we completed our work after 6 appointments. Stacey appeared satisfied with how she was viewing her past, present and future.

Arrivé
A simple game of moving things around on a desk turned into a game of interrupting thought completions in Stacey’s mind, resulting in a new way to appreciate herself and her life. The Completion Compulsion initially is to bring to awareness the need to close a loop. Don’t! Wait. See what else arrives…

@calm There is a gap between every heart beat, breath, event and response. Not only does choice exist in the space between but also a powerful awareness awaits #meditation M.O.

*Stacey is a pseudonym to protect their identity.

With thanks to Kate Bowler and Joshua Isaac Smith for words of encouragement and support to write the above.

Resources
I have cast my resource net wide to offer a useful collection of ideas in relation to interrupting our usual pattern of success arrival.
Code Switch podcast features an in-depth episode from The Nod featuring unknown celebrities who should be household names. In light of the recent events in Buffalo, I wanted to offer another story of Black life, filled with glamour joy, some tragedy and restitution.
From Criminal an unknown story of a man’s choice to create state wide change. Interruption of a status quo is how Dr. Dudley E. Flood engaged with segregation and changed the experience of schooling in North Carolina.
The Happiness Lab features Dr. Laurie Santos considering how intrusive thoughts can be redirected in this episode of The Happiness Lab.
I end with Dr. Brené Brown’s interview with Adam Grant and the benefits of remaining with an idea past it’s natural conclusion point and reconsidering an initial viewpoint. The highlight for me was when Brené spoke about the Priest and the Prosecutor. There being a fear about the Politician and what they can do with words.
Code Switch ft The Nod podcast They Don’t Say Our Names Enough
Criminal podcast The Boycott
The Happiness Lab podcast Don’t think of the white bear
Brené Brown and Adam Grant Think Again

Images
Theme: Patterns
Cover photo Blossom by Nighthawk Shoots on Unsplash
Colourful Mosaic photo by Max Williams on Unsplash
RBG Circles Photo by Parker Johnson on Unsplash
Blue Pool Pattern Photo by Marek Slomkowski on Unsplash
Gold Leaf photo by Susan Gold on Unsplash

Something Other: Peering in

Following last weeks post, that observed experiences of being othered, ostracised and shamed, attending a cultural phenomenon a nativity play. I continue this blog series observing a *recentish example of being the other remaining mute, and finding safe side bar.

Charitable Work
A few years ago, I worked for a charity where the strange experience was of being othered and held outside of. It is not because of what some staff said specifically. Most are aware that saying racist, sexist, homophobic things at work will lead to reprimands or dismissal. Racial abuse was not metered to me as a member of staff but was in the acts that had me do double takes. Questionable acts were observed discussing cases involving marginalised communities that either worked for the charity or were supported by staff.

Tops
The feeling was of not being seen, listened to, wanted, being valued and insights shared – not appreciated. As I progressed from new employee, to my first, second, third and final year with the organisation, I started to notice the holes. I shared my understandings and points for growth change and development with managers and was either ignored or the ideas petered out to nothing. The organisation whilst heavily committed to engaging in change with those worked with, was less invested in making changes amongst itself for increased employee satisfaction. Handing to a manager Brené Brown’s 10 point manifesto for improved employee satisfaction was an example of mine, to shift an experience towards health. See Below from Brené Brown’s ‘Daring Greatly’. A sense grew in me that for as long as I worked within the charity even if I made it through the glass ceiling, I would be furthermore cutting myself crawling around on the broken glass to potentially make improvements.

Square Peg
Me being seen as the other, were based on a few factors: my training, age, race and the way I saw and interacted with the world was different to most of the colleagues I worked with. I saw my difference as a strength. Others may have seen my position, as a former prison counsellor, problematic. I did not fit. They psychologists, me an integrative counsellor. My support of probation services in London was quietly daring. Sharing insights with probation officers of the psychological lives of their service users. The feeling of familiarity to the experience service users had whilst working with psychologically trained staff did not escape me. The awkwardness, the implied superiority, the speaking over and talking down to, often present. The awareness could not be brushed off, packed or folded away. An interpretation I have of the experience is that within the charity I was looked on as criminal, outside I was hero? The binary can cause ruptures in thinking. I could code switch and was okay chopping it up with service users and probation staff alike. ‘Power amongst and power to’ helped build rapport to perform my practitioners role well.

Mirroring
I often sat across from people who looked like me in probation services. A feeling as if a fellow returnee from behind the wall, often present. My crime – working whilst Black amongst a charity that chose to look the other way. Focusing on delivery, winning new sustainable and long reaching contracts, rather than it’s culture and treatment of staff. The charity was long in service and yet poor in dynamic development. Tied possibly to governmental funding cycles and predicting positive outcomes to grant applications. Other Black staff working for the charity either left their work contracts early (sometimes within weeks) or found ways to make their set of circumstances work for them. I spent over 3 years thinking I could change culture, by kindness and cakes. Small acts could, I believed fell the juggernaut of racial oppression and the sense of othering I frequently found myself battling amongst, questioning lofty ideals.

Singular
Whilst amongst a staff team, I felt some responsibility to influencing the culture. I was not alone in wanting to positively affect things but when seen as an outsider, one often cannot change what occurs in the building shouting from the pavement across the street. I read Daring Greatly in September 2015 and thought there were a number of insights shared in the book that really brought in to sharp awareness what the charity could do. I enjoyed the chapter ‘Mind the Gap’ that looked at organisational culture determining specific changes that improve experiences for all. Brené Brown lists questions that could potentially push an organisation to be aware of the unease had in areas relating to; errors, vulnerability, (**pain) shame and blame. Brené concludes observing what an actively responsible culturally aware organisation, does to support a staff team and their work. Invite communication! It is a shame that the charity I worked at, was criminally motivated to bring change only on their own terms.

The Count
I once mentioned the concern the charity may have had like this to 2 other Black members of staff.
1 is a manageable concern,
2 a problem,
3 a gang,
4 looks like an unmanageable riot
5 or more – a hostile takeover and at worse a mutiny.


My comments were made amongst a huddled meeting during a comfort break, outside on a cold, grey mid morn. The informed colleagues observed a perceived sense of paranoia from others when we rejoined the main group. I wanted to mark the occasion as important for the rarity of being seen together and seeing ourselves in a fleeting moment of solidarity – happy. When asked what were you lot talking about? Attempting to snatch the moment away. We knowingly smiled and said “Nothing that should bother you, much.” The suspicion confirming the hypothesis. We were trouble for a number of unobvious reasons. This moment sowed an important seed for me.

Street View
Being an outsider, I am often first to notice the roof smoking and catching fire. The possible routes to safety and what improvements can be made to support all who work in the building mitigate against future disaster! I am also on hand for the rescue teams when they arrive, accounting for all staff leaving the building and who may remain inside still and where they might be. We may have heard the saying ‘Prevention is better than cure’. An example could be of internally questioning what has some team members not be vocal or even in the room when choices, plans and change decisions are being made? The uneasy hard to reach one is often that which provides the most insightful answers and ways forward.

Cycle
Within a circle, each point lies equi-distant from the centre. Being amongst can feel both precious and magical. When I think of community settings, I bring to mind gatherings that enable a circle to form. Within a circle, hierarchy and importance are difficult to assume. We are all at a point equal to the other. Recognising the importance of the whole together represents one truth. The sum total of the various parts and individuals is another. One is no more relevant or important than the other. To be discounted harms the whole, which is the point I attempted to arrive at in the White Supremacy series. Whilst silenced and left to remain outside of, the remaining whole cannot be as powerful or as life altering in relation to human development of all our experiences on the planet.

Can it?

Resources
I have wanted to use this particular episode of Resistance since I listened to it earlier this year. The fit for me is, listening to Jermaine Guinyard walking a difficult path in Nebraska with his family. We listen to a story of being willfully excluded by a community and the pain that follows. We also hear how Coach G over time turns an impossible tide.

Resistance Podcast Coach G

Images
Earth photo by The New York Public Library on Unsplash

**I added to the list because pain rhymes and offers a sense of direction.

Deliciously Displayed Information – Podcasts

Growing up the radio was a constant source of information and music Radio 4, Radio 2 and Capital Radio were usually the go to favourites of the household. Moving to Peterborough in the mid 80’s that changed to Hereward Radio. What follows is a brief overview of the podcasts that have brought music, information, entertainment, humour, ideas, and education to my hungry ears. Podcasts are like audio jewels presenting content in digestible chunks like mini books.

My aim with this blog entry is to entice you, the reader, to try a few of them if you haven’t  already. If you like what you hear, drop me a line and the podcasts know your thoughts. This can be done either at their website main pages or at their itunes/soundcloud pages. A brief summary of how I came across each show and what the podcasts are about follows. I did not know what a podcast was when given an iPod Touch for a Christmas present in 2006. I began investigating what they were and how I could get my ears onto some of them. iTunes was a great source for listing what the world was listening to.

Those that I listened to initially seeking humour, satire and information included Answer Me This, Russell Brand, Dave Gorman, and then

This American Life thisamlife

The first show I listened to back in 2006 captivated me for a number of reasons. The stories that were told were human, raw, spellbinding and real. The content seemed refreshing and asked questions of the listener and of the protagonist(s) that the parts of the story discussed. Ira Glass introduces many of the shows which have headings like: The Perils of Intimacy, Getting away with it, and Infidelity and many many, more. Ira has an inquisitive yet authoritarian style of delivery when crafting each show. It’s like he has a secret box which he is inviting you the listener to peer inside. The fact that he has the box I have never questioned, nor the fact that it’s wonders he is happy to share…

The Moth Podcast the-moth

Was the 2nd Podcast show that I downloaded and got into. After one show finished I began rabidly searching for the next! The shows are captivating and have the ability to stay with you for a while. The premise of stories told without notes at first was simply an unbelieveable concept, but as I have continued to listen I have not heard papers rustle or been aware of teleprompters and so am accepting of the tag line.

As a former performance poet, it is possible to hold a group of people in sway for up to 10 minutes if the delivery offers the audience a fullness that cannot be experienced elsewhere.

My favourite story is a tale of attending a Baseball game: Look out for ‘Where’s Murphy’ There is something rich endearing and poignant in this and many of the stories I have heard over the past 10 years. There are moments whilst riding various forms of public transport I have laughed out loud or fought back tears and even let them fall when feeling ‘devil may care’. Sometimes the feelings the stories evoke are too much to hold.

Black Girls Talking

I have had the pleasure of listening to Alesia, Ramou, Fatima and Aurelia for a few years now. My search for black podcasts back in 2012 was frustrated in that I could not find many. Stumbling across Black Girls Talking podcast was a fortunate happening. I had tried to get into the black guy who tips but found the content and delivery laborsome. I enjoy the women’s conversational sharing of views on; culture, beauty, ethics, race, feminism and a Black American Women’s perspective about the world.bgt-banner

Their delivery is quick witted, intelligent, funny, and enjoyable. I grew up with 3 sisters and can understand other perspectives that are dissimilar from my own. The beauty information BGT discuss, I find useful, not for self application but to be aware of concerns from a Black woman’s point of view. As a result of the BGT podcasts I was intrigued to watch Magic Mike. Which I enjoyed and I did not think I would. BGT discussed the 2nd Magic Mike film but I wanted to see what they were comparing the newer version against. BGT nailed the psychological elements of the 1st MM film and so when I eventually watch the 2nd film I will watch in anticipation of what BGT highlighted.

Blanguage blanguage

I was introduced to this show as a result of BGT. Who ran an additional show on other shows in the podcast universe that might be of interest to listeners of BGT. Both Iman Xashi and Daniel Arthur offer listeners many things to think about from a Black British perspective. I enjoy both presenter’s energy, shared perspectives on topics relevant to the black diaspora and that they do not always agree. Which is a point of interest in hearing 2 presenters voluminously discuss their points.

Melanin Millennials melanin-mille-podcast-image

I was invited to listen to Melanin Millennials by a friend who was to be interviewed by the duo in March 2016. Satia and Imrie discuss a number of topics from a Black Female Londoners perspective each week in a humorous and insightful manner. The Millennial concept is an interesting one for the show. Arriving in the 21st century has presented a number of different understandings about the world in which we inhabit. The Internet has grown to be a phenomena unprecedented in terms of it’s reach and how it shapes the world. Aspects of intersectionality are discussed which for me offers another perspective. The show is topical fast paced, pulls no punches and offers listeners an insight to two unique perspectives about the multifaceted complex and wondrous world in which we live.

Invisibilia

Another NPR show lead me to discover Invisibilia, was Hidden Brain. There have been 2 Seasons of excellent story coverage, investigative reportage and quirks of human nature have hooked me to this podcast. Lulu Miller, Hanna Rosin and Alix Spiegel have entertained and provided an informative format to see behind the Wizard of Oz curtain and ponder on the inner workings of our minds and the world around us. The Personality Myth, The Secret Emotional Life of Clothes, Frame of Reference are great shows. The Flip The Script episode has remained a stand out show. The presenters have gone to great lengths to review stories that are immediately interesting and the idea behind flipping the script was that non complimentary behaviour can save lives. I look forward to the 3rd Season.

Code Switchcode-switch

Gene Denby, Shereen Marisol Maraji, Kat Chow, Adrian Florido, Karen Grigsby Bates discuss and share views on race and culture experienced in the US. Code Switch for me was found as another introduction by Hidden Brain. I have understood Code Switch as rapidly changing between various forms of speech modulation in various social interactions as a necessary function of being a person living in an ever changing world. Code Switch go much much farther to explore the intersectionality of race. From President Obama to the murder of Alton Sterling and A Letter From Young Asian-Americans To Their Families About Black Lives Matter. This episode is very touching and catapults the idea about the relevance of socially constructed boundaries and how useful and useless they are. The Podcast does not hide from difficult material, does not portend to answer the multifarious questions that exist about race in America. I enjoy the multifaceted experiences of the presenters, their nuanced understandings of being ‘othered’ in America and what they foresee happening in the era of Donald Trump’s presidency and the impact he is already having at all levels of American lives and the rest of World.

Serialserial

Serial was introduced to me by D who now has a podcast that I avidly listen to Broad Waters.

Season 1 of Serial is about the story of a 17 year old boy who is convicted of killing his girlfriend. The point of interest is Adnan Syed currently sits in jail and may or may not have taken her life. The 12 episodes cover in detail, aspects of the case of Adnan Syed and whether he may be the wrong person sentenced for Lee’s murder. The telling of this story is rich, complex and captivating. If there were time I would go back and listen to the show again.

Season 2 is an emotional piece covering a DUSTWUN of a soldier leaving his post, being captured by the Taliban, held hostage for a number of years, the political football his case becomes, his escape and eventual return to the US, and the public scorn he faced as an infamous returnee. Season 2 is a phenomenal story that uncovers a number of important elements about the US military’s efforts to find Bowe Berghdal, errors in judgement that may or may not have lead to fatalities of colleagues of Bowe’s, and some small successes. There was little coverage in the UK on this case but Serial are able to clarify and raise the importance of the story.

The Infinite Monkey Cage timc

Stumbling across this podcast was a revelation 6 years ago and has continued to amaze me. Robin Ince and Professor Brian Cox masterfully interweave quantum theory and physics with humour in comparison to just about everything else on the planet. I look forward to each show like I used to look forward to the Christmas Lectures on Channel 4 as a year end learning experience.

The Infinite Monkey Cage invites 2-3 guests from within a particular scientific field and a comedian to discuss the topic at hand. The comedy arises from the ludicrousness of scientific thought in that it too can be imaginative. Robin Ince also parodies Brian Cox which is often humorous and offers the listener an opportunity to reflect on the often complex information. An article I hope they discuss in the future is http://www.theearthchild.co.za/quantum-theory-consciousnessmoves-to-another-universe-after-death/

The TED Radio Hourted-radio-hour

Technology Entertainment Design is what TED stands for. The podcast is a treasure trove of ideas, impassioned story-telling and innovative ways of overcoming adversity. Every episode centres on a theme, and the presenter Guy Raz interviews each TED talker. In each interview Guy is able to dig deeper into each story and offer the listener to gain a fuller understanding behind each talk. As a Counsellor I enjoyed hearing The Act of Listening which explored what happens to the person who listens to the other. Other episodes that caught my imagination have been The Power of Design, Nudge, What Makes Us -Us, Shifting Time, Why We Lie and Extra Sensory. If I were to be honest, all shows present something unique and interesting from a wide range of human experiences.

Philosophy Bitesphilo-bites

Thinking is a past time that many people are engaged with daily. Finding a podcast that delved into philosophers from all over the world was a fascinating find as it brought ideas that I had barely thought about or vaguely heard. What is a Woman, Stocism and African Philosophers were spellbinding editions to the long list of interviews with philosophical teachers. The enjoyment gained from listening to new ideas is the feel of the mind being stretched into a nuanced awareness that impacts the way I interact with the world. After hearing different, interesting and astounding information my thoughts are nudged in new directions. This is what learning could be about – being okay with not knowing everything and humbling oneself before insightful ideas.

Piano Jazz Shortspiano-jazz

Mariane McPartland was a famous Jazz Pianist. She is joined by guests from around the Jazz world to play popular favourites and little known pieces. The show is a teaser for a longer show and the show both disappoints and thrills due to it’s 15-20 minute length. Sarah Vaughan, Nora Jones, Grover Washington Jnr and Patti Wickes all share interesting annecdotes and music with Mariane. I have enjoyed the interviews and the music played albeit for the short time the show is on for.

Satellite Coaching Loungesatellite-ife-coaching

Is dissimilar to other podcasts that interview and discuss with clients matters of import. Rebecca Gordon is able to dive in to the heart of the person being interviewed to access deep reflective personal stories that affected them, created change for themselves and others and as a listener invites an opportunity to look inward and identify what could be worked on next. Look out for interviews with Dr Shani, Joy Langley and Andrew McDonald all who share their vision, experience in the particular field of work and offer insightful reflection for the listener to begin reviewing where change could be applied to their lives. Listen with a journal so notes can be taken and applied, or discussion points raised with others.

Hidden Braininvisible-brain

Shankar Vedantam hosts a show about the inner workings of human psychology. What drew me to the show was Shankar’s youthful enthusiasm for the subject being discussed. Another feature I really enjoy about Hidden Brain is Shankar and Daniel Pink hosting stopwatch science. Which uncovers in four minutes a gigantic amount of information in a fun and engaging way. There are many things that could be learned as a result of listening to the show one example of which looked at the scientific process which could be viewed as flawed. In that no two scientific experiments produce a similar result under test conditions in different times or different places. Another episode looked at musical Savant syndrome and how Derek Amato became musically gifted after an accident. Invisible Brain presents useful information in a way that invites gentle questioning of the world in which we inhabit.

Microphone Checkmic-check

Ali Shaheed Muhammad and Frannie Kellie host a music show in relation to the development and nuance of the art form that is Hip Hop. Ali is a member of a Tribe Called Quest and Frannie is a Hip Hop journalist. The two blend knowledge about the subject, enthusiasm and great interviews offering insightful reflections for listeners. I began listening to the show as a result of Hidden Brain’s Shankar Vidantum mentioning Microphone Check as a worthwhile show to check out. Look out for Saul Williams discussing David Bowie and Martyr Loser King. A concept that has inspired Art, Music and a Book. With the respect built as a result of listening to one show I trusted Shankar’s advice and downloaded Microphone Check and have enjoyed every episode ever since.

The Science of Successscience-of-success

Matt Bodnar has crafted a worthy list of great podcasts filled with content that has the ability to entertain and make significant impact to a listeners way of being. From the intro tune through to Matt’s opener about the show and the ideas he will be presenting the learning opportunity is made apparent. The enthusiasm with which Matt shares information and the fact that he is well versed in what he has gleaned from thinkers, orators and current entrepreneurs opens a window to accessing something useful with every podcast. 3 stand out shows for me were with Rory Vaden, Vishen Likihani and Mark Manson. All discussing shifts in thinking that lead to big results for an individual.

Broad Watersbroad-waters

I had an idea a few years ago about listening to a show with 3-4 black men from the UK discussing topics that mattered to them. Finally the show exists! The 3 men, Q, D, and Ruze immerse themselves with difficult, challenging and thought provoking ideas. Look out for United States of Trump which discusses in a humorous and inspiring way US UK and European politics and how the shape of the political landscape will create change for many of the world’s citizens. Broad Waters termed after the North London Housing estate in Tottenham is a delight to listen to as the men are willing to engage with complex material and argue a point to near exhaustion in an intelligent and engaging way. If the 3 men were to have a live event I would book a front row seat.

Fighting Talkfighting-talk

Has been a long standing show that I have listened to. I began listening 5 years ago for the humour and folly of the contestants and presenters. Fighting talk is a show about sport that has 4 enthusiasts answering questions that the host presents to them. They are scored for their answers given which accumulates to the grand finale. Two of the highest awarded contestants get to fight it out by presenting an argument that the host dreams up at the end of the show. The question is called defend the indefensible and the answers by contestants have to be completed in 20 seconds. I can only imagine how uncomfortable the person being asked to speak on a topic that is against their principles may feel, and be on record for sharing! It would be like asking an esteemed psychoanalyst to refute the importance of Freud or Jung’s ideas. Colin Murray is by far the best person for the job, as he is a phenomenally impassioned sports commentator and guests appear to work well with his quick delivery and caustic remarks. If sport from a UK perspective interests you alongside comedy then Fighting Talk could be a good choice for entertainment on the commute to work.

The Black and Asian Therapist Network Podcast baatn

I would be remiss to not mention BAATN’s podcast which ran for a few years and that I sorely hope returns. As a member of BAATN, I was intrigued to find out about more of the training that BAATN has been involved with over the past few years. Eugene Ellis has an open and smooth way to introduce and discuss topics such as A Critique of the Diversity Movement, Attachment Theory and Working with Black Families, Transcending Intergenerational Trauma and Creating Partnerships with Training Organisations: Let’s Talk about Race. There is a curiosity to the podcasts and a willingness to share the journey thus far and how much farther there is still to travel. I look forward to the show’s return.

Moral Maze moral-maze

D from Broad Waters introduced me to Moral Maze. The podcast introduces to the debaters on the show a challenging idea such as A World Without Down Syndrome or Moral Imagination and Migration and interviews panellists that discuss their ideas with the debaters who then ask questions in relation to the moral position of the idea and how this then affects the individual, and the world. The first few episodes took some getting used to. The format, arguments and caustic questioning jarred my sensibilities. I got used to the rapid display of information in 4 episodes. The argument often gets heated and lost in intellectualisms. However what can be found as a result of the multiple presentation of ideas are thoughtful flexible understandings of competing associations with what is morally right or wrong. A stand out episode was Legalising Drugs which was a thoroughly engaged piece of reportage as the guests debated from all sides of the argument. Johann Hari was a phenomenally astute respectful and very listenable guest on the Legalising Drugs episode.

Alternative Introduction

In the last 10 years the industry of Podcasting has grown. I have gained a wealth of knowledge as a result and most of the information I can access share, think on and internally make use of. For me it’s about the refraction of the depth of the information gained, which is ever changing. The aim would be to develop the information from the podcasts into units of use for self and others. Listen to and Watch this space…